Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby therealdeal on Tue Jul 30, 2013 1:08 pm

Lakers will revisit defense with Rambis
July, 30, 2013
JUL 30
10:33
AM PT
McMenamin By Dave McMenamin
ESPNLosAngeles.com
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Can an NBA team lose two players who had been honored as the league's top defenders and, in the process, become a better defensive unit?

That’s what the Los Angeles Lakers are trying to find out.

Gone is their best rim protector in Dwight Howard, off to Houston. Gone, too, is their best perimeter stopper in Metta World Peace, off to New York.

Now the Lakers will find out if less is more.

Not that L.A.’s defense was any good with the services of the three-time defensive player of the year in Howard and one-time DPOY winner in World Peace, anyway. The Lakers were tied with Brooklyn for 18th in the league in defensive efficiency, allowing opponents to score 103.6 points per 100 possessions. Even with Howard patrolling the paint, L.A. ranked 22nd in the league in opponents’ field goal percentage inside of five feet, according to NBA.com Stats Cube (59.8 percent), and even with World Peace’s notoriously quick left hand, the Lakers were 26th in steals per game, generating just 7.0 a night.

“Their defense never really gave them a chance to win,” newly hired Lakers assistant coach Kurt Rambis told ESPNLosAngeles.com. “It was very erratic at best. In a lot of ways, when you bring in a lot of players from a lot of different systems, it takes awhile to get everybody connected and on the same page, how you have to defend a myriad of offensive NBA sets and you have to defend talented offensive people, it takes all five guys. They’ve got to be connected, and they’ve got to make the correct decisions at the correct time, and for the Lakers last year, it was clear that they just never really got connected on that end of the floor.

“You could see throughout most of their games, guys would turn their palms up to the sky, and it was like, ‘Is that my responsibility? Is that your responsibility? Who was supposed to do what?’ So, we’ve got to do a much better job of getting them so they can cover each others’ backs at that end of the floor.”

The reason that Rambis is back with the Lakers is not only because the team lost its two most talented defenders in Howard and World Peace, but because it lost its two most defensive-minded assistant coaches in Chuck Person, whose contract was not renewed, and Steve Clifford, who became the head coach in Charlotte.

Rambis, who assumed a defensive coordinator-type role in the final two seasons of his last run with the Lakers when Phil Jackson was head coach, said that Mike D’Antoni isn’t giving him the same label.

“(D’Antoni) said that all assistant coaches will be involved in all areas in our initial conversation,” Rambis explained. “Not that we have etched everything in stone, but to come back as a defensive coordinator, you can talk to Mike about whether there’s going to be any sort of designation on that. By my understanding, there isn’t going to be, but he just kind of wants all of the gaps to be covered so everybody is responsible for working with players and being involved in practices and being involved with games. But to have myself associated with the defense, that means that area is going to be covered.”

The Lakers have had a precipitous decline on the defensive end. After they held the Boston Celtics to just 79 points on 40.8 percent shooting in their Game 7 win in the 2010 Finals, their last three playoff appearances have ended in ugly fashion. First the Dallas Mavericks shot a blistering 46.2 percent on 3-pointers during a four-game sweep in 2011, amid Andrew Bynum decrying the team’s “trust issues” on the defensive end. Then the Oklahoma City Thunder scored 100 or more in three of their four wins against L.A. in their 2012 second-round series. Finally, in last season's first-round sweep by San Antonio, the Spurs shot a combined 53.0 percent from the floor in Games 2-4 after figuring out the Lakers' D that held them to just 37.6 percent shooting in Game 1 of the series.

“They never got connected defensively,” Rambis said of the 2012-13 season.

Having a full training camp to implement a clear defensive system and teach the terminology that goes with it could go a long way toward building that connective tissue. And having players who want to be in L.A. should help as well. As much of a beast as Howard was at times last season, if teammates can sense a player isn’t fully buying in, their motivation to do the little things -- like talk on defense or give the extra effort on help-side defense -- can wane.

It’s hard to make a fist with a broken thumb.

And while attitude might not be as big of a concern for the Lakers next season, there are still challenges among the remaining personnel that L.A. must overcome. Just look at the starting backcourt. Steve Nash is coming off a broken leg that caused lingering nerve damage all season long. He's 39 and, even in his back-to-back MVP days, struggled to guard opposing point guards because of his pedestrian foot speed and relatively small frame. Kobe Bryant is coming off a torn Achilles injury and turns 35 next month. Not to mention that his defense has already started to drop off in recent seasons. His string of six straight seasons on the NBA’s All-Defensive 1st Team came to an end in 2011-12 when he received second-team honors and then failed to make either team in ’12-13.

Then there are the injury concerns linked to a big man rotation of Pau Gasol (missed 33 games last season), Jordan Hill (missed 53) and Chris Kaman (missed 16), not that they’re considered a trio of terrific defenders when healthy in the first place.

The Lakers did their best to mitigate the losses of Howard, World Peace and Earl Clark, another capable defender, by adding younger, quicker athletes in Nick Young, Jordan Farmar and Wesley Johnson, but one player can't be expected to be a difference-maker if the whole team isn’t on the same page.

“It’s very difficult to defend people 1-on-1 in this league,” Rambis said. “You need all five guys to really stop pick-and-rolls, to stop isolations, to stop the upper echelon offensive players in this league. It’s rare that you have the guys on your team that match up well enough that you can just leave them out there on an island and they can defend people by themselves. It just doesn’t work out that way. So, with youth, with athleticism, some speed and quickness and getting guys more organized defensively, we should be able to do a much better job at that end.”

There is certainly room for improvement.
http://espn.go.com/blog/los-angeles/lakers/post/_/id/36991/lakers-will-revisit-defense-with-rambis

This is being discussed a little bit in the D'Antoni thread, but I think it deserves it's own.

Defense is going to be very different this season. Enough can't really be said about how hard it is to play defense when one person either doesn't know what they're doing or doesn't want to play. Last season was awful. I think this season the defense will be better. Not good, but better.
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby nthydro on Tue Jul 30, 2013 1:43 pm

You really believe our D will be better this season? :man3:

I hope I'm wrong but I think it'll be noticeably worse, at least with our starting lineup. Losing Howard and MWP, your 2 best defenders, along with Nash, Pau, and Kobe getting older and recovering from injuries...doesn't look too pretty. Sure we get an upgrade at PF if Hill replaces Pau, but the drop off from Howard to Pau at C is substantial. And I'm guessing Young will be our starting SF, which means another sizable downgrade from MWP.

Perhaps the addition of Rambis and whatever defensive scheme he implements would help, but I think systems can only do so much. You still need players with the ability to execute it.
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby therealdeal on Tue Jul 30, 2013 1:53 pm

Defense at this level isn't about any one person.

Losing Howard hurts, but he didn't want to be here so his effort wasn't here. Even towards the end of the year when he was healthy his impact defensively left a lot to be desired. Some of that was because our team never had a defensive scheme, but some of that was because he didn't want to be in LA and that type of anti-chemsitry is going to really hurt your team in the long run.

And as much as I love Ron Artest, Metta World Peace's defense wasn't nearly as good as Ron's was. He was slow, his offense killed us on both ends of the floor. No, the team will be better without him. We've even replaced his heart with youthful energy.

With a scheme in place and more athletic players on the perimeter off the bench, I think our defense will definitely improve. Not enough can be said about chemistry defensively. If one person isn't on the same page, defense is almost impossible to play effectively.
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby charvin on Tue Jul 30, 2013 2:25 pm

nthydro wrote:You really believe our D will be better this season? :man3:

I hope I'm wrong but I think it'll be noticeably worse, at least with our starting lineup. Losing Howard and MWP, your 2 best defenders, along with Nash, Pau, and Kobe getting older and recovering from injuries...doesn't look too pretty. Sure we get an upgrade at PF if Hill replaces Pau, but the drop off from Howard to Pau at C is substantial. And I'm guessing Young will be our starting SF, which means another sizable downgrade from MWP.

Perhaps the addition of Rambis and whatever defensive scheme he implements would help, but I think systems can only do so much. You still need players with the ability to execute it.


It could be. As the article states, defense can't be all about 1-on-1 defense, good example was last season with D12 manning the middle. While he's considered a great defensive player, with no scheme, system, or trust, it was exposed as being a pretty bad defensive unit (high 20's?)

I'm not one to say that it will definitely be better, but a team doesn't need to have each player as a great defender to be a good defensive team. TRD noted the Spurs as an example, Duncan and Leonard are really the only 2 players considered to be good defensive players, the rest is a byproduct of the system implemented by Pops. To sum up my thoughts, I agree with the point that as long as each player on the court has an idea of what to do defensively when the ball is in "x" spot of the floor, it will work itself out.
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby Armani on Tue Jul 30, 2013 2:37 pm

A lot of defense is about good habits, consistent effort, focus, etc. All this has to be instilled into the team by the coach, and this falls on Rambis now. The main problem with this team is the lack of a defensive anchor, which means at best we'll be average on that end (though, I'll be THRILLED if we're average on D next season). It doesn't help that Kobe and Nash are so bad on D, either. At least Gasol's move to Center means he'll be better on D, as he doesn't have to face athletic PF's anymore.
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby LTLakerFan on Tue Jul 30, 2013 2:59 pm

I really, really, really, would like to see Pau work the weight room like he did several years back. Will never be a "strong" guy down there but my god how hard can it be to be a "little" more solid and strong to help absorb the pounding, give at least a little bit of it back, and still keep his skills?
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby lakerfan2 on Tue Jul 30, 2013 3:04 pm

Pau isn't that bad of a post defender, it's his laterally quickness that I don't think he'll ever have.

His length allows him to play guys like Dirk and Howard straight up. It's when the smaller, but stronger guys are able to maneuver around him that gets him off guard.
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby nba2k14 on Wed Jul 31, 2013 5:52 pm

It doesn't matter what scheme or defensive system you instill, you still need legit defensive-mind player to execute it. There's none on this team. Last I check, Rambis' Wolves are at the bottom of NBA defense and that team has some young blood.
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby Pig Miller on Wed Jul 31, 2013 8:06 pm

good defense comes down to:

1) pride, individually and as a team
2) willingness to play hard for the other guys on the team
3) communication

if we come into the season with those 3 traits on the defensive end, we can at least be respectable
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby noobiew on Wed Jul 31, 2013 8:13 pm

So Kurt Rambis triangle defense with Mike D'Antoni offensive scheme ? :man1:
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby Vasashi17 on Thu Aug 01, 2013 1:41 pm

Forget Rambis....get Jimmy to coach the D. I mean, the man was responsible in stopping the vaunted triangle offense dead in its tracks last season. :man1:
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby Rooscooter on Thu Aug 01, 2013 9:46 pm

Vasashi17 wrote:Forget Rambis....get Jimmy to coach the D. I mean, the man was responsible in stopping the vaunted triangle offense dead in its tracks last season. :man1:


Well...... to be fair.. Dallas pretty much killed it the previous season....
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby Vasashi17 on Thu Aug 01, 2013 10:40 pm

Roo, I have agreed with you pretty much on everything...but I still think Dallas got hot on a hobbled Lakers squad. If you consider Kobe's injury along with Phil's diagnosis and a battered core that just went to 3 Finals appearances, it was just a perfect storm for Dallas.
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby JSM on Sun Aug 04, 2013 12:55 pm

I'm really looking forward to the feeling of comfort of seeing Rambis back on the sideline. At least having one qualified coach (even though he's a subpar head coach) on the staff is going to help. He will help our defensive schemes a great deal, I believe. We will be an inferior team defensively than we were a year ago, that's just the nature of the beast anytime you lose your two best defensive players, have a hobbled Kobe, and start Steve Nash. But I do believe there will be a better effort defensively from all the players and they'll buy into the team concept moreso than last year.
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby Rooscooter on Sun Aug 04, 2013 1:04 pm

Vasashi17 wrote:Roo, I have agreed with you pretty much on everything...but I still think Dallas got hot on a hobbled Lakers squad. If you consider Kobe's injury along with Phil's diagnosis and a battered core that just went to 3 Finals appearances, it was just a perfect storm for Dallas.


That season we couldn't score in the late 4th quarter.... it was that way all season. This was the "Kobe isolation" time. He'd play 32 Minutes in the first 3 and then side iso ever possession down the stretch. Phil had to be onboard with it..... and had to do if for a reason that he saw (ineffectiveness of the offense). Most here blamed defense for that loss, but if you look at the stats we scored on average 6 points less a game than Dallas (one of the worst scoring defenses in the league that year) let up.... it was our offense that failed. Pau and Lamar were the primary culprits as well.
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby dwighthowardsdad on Sun Aug 04, 2013 7:20 pm

I'm hoping to see more of a "team effort." Ideally, I want Rambis to install a defensive scheme and even more important an identity; I want the players to know their responsibility & know where to be and not look at each other when someone scores on an uncontested layup.
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby dwighthowardsdad on Tue Aug 06, 2013 10:49 am

Lakers Q&A: Kurt Rambis on assistant gig, Phil Jackson, Mike D’Antoni & defense
How did your role as a Lakers assistant coach under Mike D’Antini materialize?

Rambis: “It started with a conversation several weeks ago initiated by Mike D’Antoni. We had breakfast and he said he was interested in me working as an assistant coach for him. It was that simple and that plain. I jumped at it right away. I thought it would be a really interesting situation.

Why were you surprised about it?

Rambis: Well, it wasn’t what I was expecting. That’s where the surprise came from. We’ve known each other in the past. I wasn’t sure what direction the conversation was going to go. I’m always fine with sitting down with people and talking basketball. I had other conversations with a lot of head coaches.

Is it accurate that your role is going to entail primarily overseeing the team’s defense?

Rambis: I don’t know if it’s been stated as such. But that’s how I view the sport. I look at what any team can do to get stops. It’s critical to win games in the NBA. It takes five guys to figure out how to stop a ball. When you’re playing against talented offensive players, a myriad of challenges come up in figuring out how to stop them. It takes all five guys being on the same page. That’s how I look at things. On the other end, you’re trying to utilize your offensive talents and seeing how the other team is playing defense. You look at how they play defense and what we can do to take advantage of that based on the talent on offense that we have.

What’s your vision on how the Lakers play defense next season

Rambis: We haven’t sat down and formulated anything. Mike and I have a similar concept in what we want to do. But we haven’t walked through all of the steps. Even if you take wing screen-and-roll, there’s a lot of things offensively that can happen. How to defend all those different options. A wing screen-and-roll involving Dwight Howard and a wing screen-and-roll involving Dirk Nowitzki makes you defend it differently. We have to go through that process to make sure we’re all on the same page to look at those situations and defend him. That’s a simplistic example, but it’s clear the difference between the two.

With your mention that it takes five guys, how does the Lakers offset the absences that Dwight Howard and Metta World Peace brought on defense? Whenever you have gifted players on either end of the floor, they can make up for a lot of mistakes. If you have a very gifted offensive player, your offense can be run really sloppy out there and the guy makes an incredible shot with two guys hanging on him. That wasn’t great offensive execution. That was just a great player making a great play. It’s the same way on the defensive end.

Rambis: When you have defensive oriented players, they can cover up a lot of mistakes. Even with that, you need five guys connected in knowing how you’re going to defend this action and know you need to be in this spot. When the guy’s on the strong side, this is what you need to do. When the guy’s on the weak side, this is what you need to do. Here’s what the offensive options are and these are the areas you have to cover when the ball moves. It’s just a matter of going through that, rehearsing it and making sure everybody understands it. Everybody has to communicate. Guys make mistakes. The offense changes and makes an adjustment. It’s always on the floor. Guys will have to read and react and communicate and cover up for each other.

What was your view as an analyst for ESPN and Time Warner Cable SportsNet last year that contributed to the Lakers’ defensive issues? When you had talented offensive players like the Lakers had, they can make up for a lot of mistakes. They thought they didn’t have to run everything perfectly as long as they had spacing and movement. Offensive players can figure out how to score. When you have new faces and a lot of people coming from different backgrounds, there’s different terminology. You can be talking about the exact same sequence, but everybody calls it something differently.

It never looked like they were consistently on the same page. It never seemed like when this happens, they know how they were going to defend it. There was always lapses. With veteran players, it seemed like that shouldn’t happen. They never really got connected. It put all their pressure on their offense. They had to figure out how to continually score because their defense wasn’t figuring out how to get stops.

When you look at this roster, the pieces they got in Chris Kaman, Wesley Johnson, Nicky Young and Jordan Farmar appear on paper to be better fits for Mike D’Antoni’s system. But how can the defense minimize issues on transition defense , on missed shots, etc? Your defense starts a lot with your offense and making sure guys understand where shots are going to come from and making sure the proper people are getting back with your guards and small forward depending on who shoots the ball. They need to get back to slow the ball down and make sure there’s organization in transition.

When you look at the team, yeah, they have some more athletic people. But they still have people who want to get the ball inside. I’m not sure you’re looking at an extremely fast team. Certainly, they’re a team that can push the ball a little bit. It’s easier to run your offense against a team that, even if they’re getting back on defense, aren’t completely organized. You can run things then better than if you’re going against a set halfcourt defense. To me, it all starts with your offense. Guys will have to know which shots are going to be taken. Your offense helps create good shots. Then everyone understands how you get back on transition and then it builds from there.

With the relationship you have with Phil Jackson, what does that do for the team? He and I have basketball conversations, whether it was last year or the year before. It’s been an ongoing situation, even when I was coaching in Minnesota (2009-2011). It’s not like that’s going to stop. But he’s not the only coach that I talk to. I have several coaching friends throughout the NBA that I talk to and run things across. I ask, ‘In this situation, how did you handle this?’ or ‘I saw this on your team. That was really good.’ I ask them about their thought process. It’s always good to bounce things off from different coaches and get different perspectives.

Which particular coaches beyond Phil that you talk with on a normal basis regarding that?

Rambis: It’s probably inappropriate. Phil is a natural connection. But I don’t know if organizations will be saying, ‘I want you to talk about that.’” (laughs)

Are you planning to incorporate any of the concepts you learned from Phil in terms of the triangle offense and how you oversaw the defense on his teams?

Rambis: What that offense did that was really good is a lot of it is spacing and a lot of it is changing sides of the floor and guys moving without the ball. But those are sound fundamental basketball concepts. It’s not like any good organized offense wouldn’t have that. That’s what you need in order to beat defenses. You have to move the ball around and shift people around so the defense has to shift. When I look around the league and I watch teams play, most teams use concepts of the triangle in their offense. They may not run that. But there’s concepts. There’s the spacing and the two-man game. There’s aspects of it that you use. It’s not like it happens on a continual basis. But it does happen.

You were fairly candid last year as far as assessing the Lakers. Given that dynamic, are there any particular things you have addressed to Mike or plan to address to Mike on any concerns on how he handled personnel and overall strategy? No, I mean he came into a tough situation. I understood his situation because I came in [1999] and filled in for Del Harris. You had your vision on how things should be different and how things should be run. When you had injuries and a lack of practice time, it’s hard to get what you want across. You also really don’t know a team intimately until you’re out there working with players.

Rambis: It’s easy to say from the outside. That’s why it’s easy to be an analyst and say, ‘This should be happening.’ Then you start to see the players and how they have a hard time doing what you want them to do. You have to get out there and see how your team is and adjust and react and see how quickly they pick up things. If you talk the exact same thing on every same team and went through things, you would have some teams that got the stuff real quick and then some players that really struggled with it. Depending on what you’re teaching with it, some of the players would change. Different people may pick it up quicker. You just have to work with players. When I’m looking at the talent that’s out there on the floor, I didn’t think there was good spacing and ball movement. And I knew where some of the players liked to play and where they wanted the ball. So that’s when I said, ‘This is what I think should be happening.’”

So you’ll have a tougher gig this year.

Rambis: Absolutely. I can do that with every single team. Even when you’re looking at Miami, I was thinking they needed to get LeBron [James] into the post a lot more. They need to get him on the elbow where they can see defenders coming at him and double teaming him, while he can shoot the ball or attack the basket. It wasn’t just this situation. It was just my basketball opinion.

Where do you think your past experiences as the Lakers’ interim coach (in 1999) and an assistant under Phil (1999-2009) come into play particularly with working with Kobe and Pau?

Rambis:I think I understand their personalities. I understand their vision of the sport and view of the sport and where they like to have the basketball and operate from and where they like to play. It will be interesting with Kobe. You don’t know what player you’re going to get. Pau, too. They’re both going into be in contract years and have to make sure they’re both in good health. It’s going to be interesting trying to see not only how they play individually but how they fit in with everybody else. As a coach, you have to be able to coach the players you have and not worry about the players you don’t have. We’ll come in with a game plan and say these are the things we’ll focus on. We’ll talk about how we can tweak these things and make them work and make them more comfortable and get them to spots on the floor they can excel in.

With Kobe specifically on defense, it seems one-on-one that he’s had success. But when he’s off-the-ball, there’s so many instances where he’s roaming around and things get lost in the mix with that. How do you address that part?

Rambis: Everybody needs to understand, like I was talking about earlier, that when we’re defending this offensive situation, these are the spots we need to get at people. When the offensive personnel changes, people need to shift on defense too. We need to articulate which spots we need to have filled and then there needs to be great communication. Then if we do this correctly defensively, we need to know these are going to be the offensive outlets for guys and this is what they’re going to look for. That’s when we can anticipate and read and get steals if we know where they’re going to try to have the basketball. Does that work 100 percent of the time? No. The offense won’t just stand in the spots and be predictable. They’re going to react too. That’s why guys have to get the concepts and then communicate and react to the situations. Everyone is involved in it. Every position is critical to help stop the ball.

I know obviously the direct thing in front of you is your assistant coaching gig, but are you still aiming to become an NBA head coach?

Rambis: Absolutely, but will I freak out if it doesn’t happen? No. I like coaching. Being an assistant coach does not bother me at all. I enjoy working with players in game and practice situations. If the right situation came along, I would certainly consider it. To answer your question directly, that’s my ultimate goal. But if it doesn’t happen, I’m okay with that.

http://www.insidesocal.com/lakers/2013/ ... i-defense/
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby Rooscooter on Tue Aug 06, 2013 1:26 pm

dwighthowardsdad wrote:I'm hoping to see more of a "team effort." Ideally, I want Rambis to install a defensive scheme and even more important an identity; I want the players to know their responsibility & know where to be and not look at each other when someone scores on an uncontested layup.


If we truly are going up-tempo with the real MDA offense position and responsibilities will have little to do with how we play defense.

The problem with this type of offense is that there is no expected shooting zone or person taking the shot.... it's chaos by design. That in turn, creates chaos in transition defense which is where MDA's teams have historically fallen apart. Rarely if ever do you get in a situation where we would be jacking up the first open shot while at the same time be orderly in getting back into defensive position. Chaos breed chaos. That's what we saw last year until we put the ball in Kobe's hands and he walked it up.... ironically the defense got better about then as well...... :man10:
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Re: Lakers revisit Defense with Rambis (Mcmenamin Report)

Postby lakersin4 on Tue Aug 06, 2013 2:58 pm

Rooscooter wrote:
dwighthowardsdad wrote:I'm hoping to see more of a "team effort." Ideally, I want Rambis to install a defensive scheme and even more important an identity; I want the players to know their responsibility & know where to be and not look at each other when someone scores on an uncontested layup.


If we truly are going up-tempo with the real MDA offense position and responsibilities will have little to do with how we play defense.

The problem with this type of offense is that there is no expected shooting zone or person taking the shot.... it's chaos by design. That in turn, creates chaos in transition defense which is where MDA's teams have historically fallen apart. Rarely if ever do you get in a situation where we would be jacking up the first open shot while at the same time be orderly in getting back into defensive position. Chaos breed chaos. That's what we saw last year until we put the ball in Kobe's hands and he walked it up.... ironically the defense got better about then as well...... :man10:
This is one of the main reasons I'd love it if Lebron became a Laker.. He recovers from breakdowns in transition D like noone else in the game.. He'd be perfect to hide our flaws on D.
lakersin4

 
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