Bynum Discussion

Re: Another Injection For Drew (Pg. 2)

Postby therealdeal on Mon Oct 15, 2012 1:24 pm

rev...

It's a needle with fluid being injected into your knee. It's not ibuprofen or a specific training regimen. It's non invasive because he doesn't require anesthetics and a surgeon, but that doesn't mean it's anything like what Nash does. He still needs a needle full of fluid to lubricate his knees. If this was normal, we'd be hearing about it all over the NBA. This is not normal and it's not good.

This is a bandaid procedure that hides the problem: his knees aren't lubricated. Someone who is on dialysis is hiding their failed kidneys with a "non invasive" procedure, but that's different from the diabetic who changes their eating habits and lifestyle to stay healthy.
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Re: Another Injection For Drew (Pg. 2)

Postby KB24 on Mon Oct 15, 2012 1:38 pm

BTW we aren't just talking about an injection...we are talking about

multiple surgeries on the same knee
multiple injections a year
all sort of protective gear for this entire career
all sort of rest during the summer
all sort of medical treatment and therapy during the season
getting his knee drained a lot of times

Bynum's knee needs constant monitoring 24/7. Sure, if he can play on it, its fine but the fact that every awkward move could ruin his career is always there sadly. Nash does have a bad back but nobody is losing any sleep over it.

I'm sure all NBA players are always hurt and need to get constant treatment to perform at a high level for 10+ years. Everybody has maintenance techniques and therapists.
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Re: Another Injection For Drew (Pg. 2)

Postby purp n gold on Mon Oct 15, 2012 1:44 pm

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Re: Another Injection For Drew (Pg. 2)

Postby revgen on Mon Oct 15, 2012 1:52 pm

therealdeal wrote:rev...

It's a needle with fluid being injected into your knee. It's not ibuprofen or a specific training regimen. It's non invasive because he doesn't require anesthetics and a surgeon, but that doesn't mean it's anything like what Nash does. He still needs a needle full of fluid to lubricate his knees. If this was normal, we'd be hearing about it all over the NBA. This is not normal and it's not good.

This is a bandaid procedure that hides the problem: his knees aren't lubricated. Someone who is on dialysis is hiding their failed kidneys with a "non invasive" procedure, but that's different from the diabetic who changes their eating habits and lifestyle to stay healthy.


1) Unless you're afraid of needles, I'm not buying your argument. Both are maintenance procedures. The way Nash sits on the floor when he's out of the game to keep his back loose isn't normal either. If we're going to by normalcy (what the majority of players do) rather than practicality (are they performing on the court), then what Bynum is doing isn't normal. But if he's peforming at a high level then I don't see how that matters.

2) Bynum most likely wouldn't need the lubricant if he wasn't playing pro basketball. To compare him to a dialysis patient is a bit over the top.
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Re: Another Injection For Drew (Pg. 2)

Postby therealdeal on Mon Oct 15, 2012 2:08 pm

1. My fear of needles DOESN'T have any impact on this conversation. The fact of the matter is that one is a man sitting on the ground and one is a man getting a needle to the knee every few months. If you can't see the difference there, then I can't help you.

2. I'm not comparing Drew to a dialysis patient and you know that. I'm comparing his health situation to someone on dialysis. YOU compared Steve Nash's treatment of his back to Drew's treatment of his knees. THAT is over the top since they are EXTREMELY different. Nash doesn't need regular injections to keep his back healthy and he hasn't had multiple surgeries there either. The idea that the two are the same is ludicrous.

What I was saying isn't that hard to grasp: a dialysis patient is reliant on daily care to stay healthy enough to function, care that must be provided from outside help. This is true no matter the situation because their kidneys cannot support their body. Someone who is diabetic, or pre-diabetic, can survive by monitoring their own health and is not necessarily DEPENDENT on outside assistance to stay healthy. They may need it from time to time, but for the most part they can remain healthy by monitoring their blood sugar levels.

The comparison is that Drew NEEDS those injections to stay healthy enough to function in the NBA. Steve Nash DOES NOT need those injections, he needs to monitor his health. I am not saying Drew is reliant on this procedure for his general health, that's stupid. I am saying his reliance on lubricant injections to maintain a high level of performance is a bandaid that is not good for him.
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Re: Another Injection For Drew (Pg. 2)

Postby revgen on Mon Oct 15, 2012 2:11 pm

KB24 wrote:BTW we aren't just talking about an injection...we are talking about

multiple surgeries on the same knee
multiple injections a year
all sort of protective gear for this entire career
all sort of rest during the summer
all sort of medical treatment and therapy during the season
getting his knee drained a lot of times

Bynum's knee needs constant monitoring 24/7. Sure, if he can play on it, its fine but the fact that every awkward move could ruin his career is always there sadly. Nash does have a bad back but nobody is losing any sleep over it.

I'm sure all NBA players are always hurt and need to get constant treatment to perform at a high level for 10+ years. Everybody has maintenance techniques and therapists.


1) He hasn't had a major surgery in over two years.
2) Which are non-invasive maintenance procedures that don't prevent him from performing.
3) Which don't prevent him from performing at an all-star and all-nba level.
4) That's what summer is for. To rest the body and work on your skills.
5) See #3.
6) He hasn't had his knee drained in over 2 years now.

Bynum's injury period was from January 2008 (his first major injury) to April 2010 (his last major injury, which he still managed to play through). That's 2 years and 3 months. It's now October 2012. Which means it's been 2 years and 6 months since he's had a major injury. So basically, Bynum's post-injury period has lasted longer than the period in which he suffered major injuries, yet people like yourself are still scared that he may make an "awkward move" and hurt himself despite the fact that he wears a brace that prevents him from doing so?
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Re: Another Injection For Drew (Pg. 2)

Postby revgen on Mon Oct 15, 2012 2:32 pm

therealdeal wrote:1. My fear of needles DOESN'T have any impact on this conversation. The fact of the matter is that one is a man sitting on the ground and one is a man getting a needle to the knee every few months. If you can't see the difference there, then I can't help you.

2. I'm not comparing Drew to a dialysis patient and you know that. I'm comparing his health situation to someone on dialysis. YOU compared Steve Nash's treatment of his back to Drew's treatment of his knees. THAT is over the top since they are EXTREMELY different. Nash doesn't need regular injections to keep his back healthy and he hasn't had multiple surgeries there either. The idea that the two are the same is ludicrous.

What I was saying isn't that hard to grasp: a dialysis patient is reliant on daily care to stay healthy enough to function, care that must be provided from outside help. This is true no matter the situation because their kidneys cannot support their body. Someone who is diabetic, or pre-diabetic, can survive by monitoring their own health and is not necessarily DEPENDENT on outside assistance to stay healthy. They may need it from time to time, but for the most part they can remain healthy by monitoring their blood sugar levels.

The comparison is that Drew NEEDS those injections to stay healthy enough to function in the NBA. Steve Nash DOES NOT need those injections, he needs to monitor his health. I am not saying Drew is reliant on this procedure for his general health, that's stupid. I am saying his reliance on lubricant injections to maintain a high level of performance is a bandaid that is not good for him.


1) I'm sorry, but I think it does. Otherwise you wouldn't keep bringing it up constantly.

2) The Dialysis comparison is over the top and you know it. Bynum's situation isn't a life and death situation. If you wanted to make an honest comparison, you would have brought up Cortisone shots that football players take to keep the pain under control.

Nash doesn't need injections, but he does have to sit on the floor in awkward positions to keep his back loose. If he hadn't been doing it for eight years, I doubt you would have found that comforting to look at. He's been doing it forever and has performed at a high-level despite it, so nobody cares anymore. If Bynum does the same for eight years most people would probably see his knee injections in the same manner. Well, at least not the ones who don't have a fear of needles anyway.
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Re: Another Injection For Drew (Pg. 2)

Postby therealdeal on Mon Oct 15, 2012 2:40 pm

1. You're trying to change the situation by putting the onus on me, it's transparent and it's a poor counter to my argument. A needle in the knee is no where near doing core strength exercises and the mere idea that it is the same is preposterous and I expect better from a smart person like you.

2. I did not say it was a life and death situation. I said the situation of DEPENDANCY is the same and that's not a stretch. Bynum is DEPENDANT on these shots in order to perform. Cortizone is actually an awful comparison; the only similarity being a needle involved. Cortizone is not a treatment, it's pain killer. A workout regimen can be considered a treatment. The shots that Bynum recieves can be considered a treatment. A Cortizone shot does nothing to treat, it only masks pain which in many cases results in further injury.

You keep bringing up my supposed fear of needles, a fear that you fabricated, and it's hilarious. You're doing it because you know the argument you're making sounds ridiculous. If you didn't love Bynum so much, you'd be able to seperate yourself from this and realize that the comparison you're making is just awful.
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Re: Another Injection For Drew (Pg. 2)

Postby revgen on Mon Oct 15, 2012 2:51 pm

therealdeal wrote:1. You're trying to change the situation by putting the onus on me, it's transparent and it's a poor counter to my argument. A needle in the knee is no where near doing core strength exercises and the mere idea that it is the same is preposterous and I expect better from a smart person like you.

2. I did not say it was a life and death situation. I said the situation of DEPENDANCY is the same and that's not a stretch. Bynum is DEPENDANT on these shots in order to perform. Cortizone is actually an awful comparison; the only similarity being a needle involved. Cortizone is not a treatment, it's pain killer. A workout regimen can be considered a treatment. The shots that Bynum recieves can be considered a treatment. A Cortizone shot does nothing to treat, it only masks pain which in many cases results in further injury.

You keep bringing up my supposed fear of needles, a fear that you fabricated, and it's hilarious. You're doing it because you know the argument you're making sounds ridiculous. If you didn't love Bynum so much, you'd be able to seperate yourself from this and realize that the comparison you're making is just awful.


1) I never the changed the situation. It was YOU who admitted that you're afraid of needles in your previous post.

2) If a player is dependent upon Cortizone to play, then what's the difference? Cortizone is a more than appropriate comparison to make.

3) I fabricated? You're the one who admitted to being afraid of needles. :man10: Did I fabricate that?
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Re: Another Injection For Drew (Pg. 2)

Postby therealdeal on Mon Oct 15, 2012 3:48 pm

1. No I didn't. It was a poorly worded sentence, but I have no fear of needles. Not to mention my fear of needles isn't the discussion it's your poorly argued point that injections in Bynum's knee are the same as Nash stretching on the sideline. Please. It's ludicrous and beneath you. You're letting your love for Bynum completely cloud your common sense.

2. Because there is no such thing as a player being dependent on Cortizone to play regularly. That doesn't make any sense medically. If you think that makes sense, I suggest reading up on exactly what Cortizone does and how it affects your body and health.

Yes you keep bringing that up. I never said that I was afraid of needles and it is completely irrelevant even if I was. You're stooping VERY low for this argument and you're better than that.
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Re: Another Injection For Drew (Pg. 2)

Postby revgen on Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:05 pm

therealdeal wrote:1. No I didn't. It was a poorly worded sentence, but I have no fear of needles. Not to mention my fear of needles isn't the discussion it's your poorly argued point that injections in Bynum's knee are the same as Nash stretching on the sideline. Please. It's ludicrous and beneath you. You're letting your love for Bynum completely cloud your common sense.

2. Because there is no such thing as a player being dependent on Cortizone to play regularly. That doesn't make any sense medically. If you think that makes sense, I suggest reading up on exactly what Cortizone does and how it affects your body and health.

Yes you keep bringing that up. I never said that I was afraid of needles and it is completely irrelevant even if I was. You're stooping VERY low for this argument and you're better than that.


1) They are the same in terms of what they cost the player in time taken away from the court. 0 days. There's no rest or rehabilitation involved. So far, I've yet to hear an argument from you saying otherwise.

2) There have been players who've admitted to taking Cortisone on a regular basis to keep playing the game. Even admitting that they couldn't have played without it. Should they have been taking it on a regular basis? Probably not, but they doesn't change the fact that they did.

"While that cortisone was in there, I was great," Putz said. "But cortisone is nothing but a Band-Aid anyway. It masks the problem. That's all it really is. With me there was really nothing structurally wrong, so I don't know if anything really got worse.


http://www.newsday.com/sports/baseball/mets/how-the-mets-season-broke-down-and-fell-apart-1.1397521

The "band-aid" that Putz describes pretty much describes your POV on Bynum's injections.

therealdeal wrote:
This is a bandaid procedure that hides the problem


Dialysis is not a "band-aid" procedure. Not even close.

3) As you admitted above, your words were poorly worded. 2nd of all, you don't know me. You can get off your high horse and quit the patronizing tone.
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Re: Another Injection For Drew (Pg. 2)

Postby therealdeal on Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:33 pm

I'm pretty much done with this. I'll make my closing statements and be on my way.

1. The end result of missing zero games means nothing to me. Do the ends justify the means in every case? I'd argue in most cases no they don't. One man gets rich through hard work and sacrifice. Another wins the lottery. Which one made it there in the most ideal way? If Bynum needs injections every few months to maintain this level of play, that's a far cry from a man who needs to stretch on the sidelines.

You want my argument? Bynum's knees are done. Just like the kidneys of a dialysis patient they require constant medical attention just to function in the way he needs them to. He needs constant injections and a brace worn at all times just to have knees that work well enough to perform. Nash needs to stretch on the sidelines. If you can't see the difference, that's not my problem.

2. You give me a link to an article titled "How the Mets' Season Broke Down and Fell Apart" and you expect that to SUPPORT your argument? :man10: All you did was support what I said! Cortizone shots do not do anything to help you perform, in most cases they harm you because you don't feel the pain that's a result of extreme damage to your body! Just because two things are band-aids doesn't mean they're the same type of bandage!

Bynum's knee gets a lubricant injection. It helps his knee perform for a limited time. If he got a Cortizone shot instead he'd tear anything left in his decrepit knees and probably struggle to walk normally the rest of his life due to his size. Your argument is awful.

No I don't know you. But I've been on this site for more than 4 years now and I've always respected you and your opinions. You've been a quality poster here the entire time I have and your posting style was one of my deciding factors in signing up here. But your defense of Bynum is ridiculous and it's been hard for me to read because it holds no objectivity whatsoever.

Fine, I don't know you. I'll be done responding to posts like this from now on and I suppose I'll take my Bynum thoughts elsewhere.
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Re: Another Injection For Drew (Pg. 2)

Postby revgen on Mon Oct 15, 2012 5:10 pm

therealdeal wrote:I'm pretty much done with this. I'll make my closing statements and be on my way.

1. The end result of missing zero games means nothing to me. Do the ends justify the means in every case? I'd argue in most cases no they don't. One man gets rich through hard work and sacrifice. Another wins the lottery. Which one made it there in the most ideal way? If Bynum needs injections every few months to maintain this level of play, that's a far cry from a man who needs to stretch on the sidelines.


Bynum missing 0 games means nothing to you? Really? Okay, it looks like we're getting somewhere. If I knew this, then I wouldn't bothered having this argument with you.

Unless these injections have negative side-effects that will harm him long-term, I don't really see what your point is.

therealdeal wrote:You want my argument? Bynum's knees are done. Just like the kidneys of a dialysis patient they require constant medical attention just to function in the way he needs them to. He needs constant injections and a brace worn at all times just to have knees that work well enough to perform. Nash needs to stretch on the sidelines. If you can't see the difference, that's not my problem.


Like you said before, you don't care if Bynum happens to miss 0 games with these procedures and you don't seem to care if he happens to perform at an all-star level with these procedures. All that matters is that Bynum receives an injection and Nash has to stretch on the sideline. Nevermind how they perform on the court.

therealdeal wrote:2. You give me a link to an article titled "How the Mets' Season Broke Down and Fell Apart" and you expect that to SUPPORT your argument? :man10: All you did was support what I said! Cortizone shots do not do anything to help you perform, in most cases they harm you because you don't feel the pain that's a result of extreme damage to your body! Just because two things are band-aids doesn't mean they're the same type of bandage!


Actually it does support my argument, because the player I quoted didn't suffer further structural damage while playing with Cortisone. And he said he felt great performing with it.

therealdeal wrote:Bynum's knee gets a lubricant injection. It helps his knee perform for a limited time. If he got a Cortizone shot instead he'd tear anything left in his decrepit knees and probably struggle to walk normally the rest of his life due to his size. Your argument is awful.


I'm not sure what you're saying here. I was comparing how Cortisone works compared to Dialysis. Not the Synvisc injection. Both Cortizone and Syncvisc act as agents to help an athlete perform on the field. They are not life or death procedures.

therealdeal wrote:No I don't know you. But I've been on this site for more than 4 years now and I've always respected you and your opinions. You've been a quality poster here the entire time I have and your posting style was one of my deciding factors in signing up here. But your defense of Bynum is ridiculous and it's been hard for me to read because it holds no objectivity whatsoever.


My objectivity is fine since I'm arguing how Bynum performs. Not the procedures and methods he uses to get onto the court and perform. As far as I'm concerned, as long as the techniques he uses are legal and don't carry long-term risks, I don't care how he does it. You obviously do. So be it.

therealdeal wrote:Fine, I don't know you. I'll be done responding to posts like this from now on and I suppose I'll take my Bynum thoughts elsewhere.


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Re: Another Injection For Drew (Pg. 2)

Postby therealdeal on Mon Oct 15, 2012 6:37 pm

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Re: Andrew Bynum Discussion

Postby revgen on Tue Oct 16, 2012 10:07 am

Sixers' Andrew Bynum to begin practicing Oct. 24

When 76ers coach Doug Collins and his team centerpiece, Andrew Bynum, had a recent conversation, the center told Collins that if they were in the regular season, he would be able to play right now.

But the reality is that they are not in the regular season and Bynum is scheduled to have further injections in both knees Monday to help lubricate the joints and better prepare them for the regular season.

Bynum will receive an injection of Synvisc-One. Used for the treatment of osteoarthritis, it is a natural substance that lubricates and cushions the joints. It is believed to provide up to six months of protection. According to his agent, Bynum will receive another injection at the all-star break.

The treatment is not related to the platelet therapy that Bynum underwent last month in Germany.

"Andrew's doing well," Collins said Monday before the Sixers improved their preseason record to 2-1 with a 107-75 victory over Boston at the Wells Fargo Center. "He's progressing and on track to where I think he hoped he would be at this time. Obviously, the next step for him is getting running and weight-bearing."

The plan for Bynum's return to the court is for three days of practice beginning Oct. 24. Collins plans on a break for the Sixers on Oct. 27 and then practice the next three days before the team opens the season at home against Denver on Oct. 31.

Bynum was acquired in a four-team trade on Aug. 10. Last season, he averaged career highs in points (18.7) and rebounds (11.8). He also blocked 1.98 shots per game and was named second-team all-NBA.

Bynum's conditioning will be a concern. While he is able to do some cardiovascular work on what Collins has described as an "antigravity machine," there is nothing Bynum can do to prepare him for games.

"A lot of that is going to be how he responds to increased activity," Collins said when asked if Bynum would be ready for the start of the season. "I know how important the home opener is, but we're not going to do anything silly and have another setback where it costs you and now you have to miss those kinds of games."

Boston coach Doc Rivers, close friends with Collins, said that working a big player back into the lineup and getting players accustomed to him is easier than it is with smaller players.

"It is easier with a big [man], I would say that - he's going to be big when he plays," Rivers said. "He's still going to be seven feet today and tomorrow. I think it's a lot tougher when you have guards and you are trying to integrate them into your system."

Hawes leads way. Spencer Hawes came off the bench for 17 points and eight rebounds to lead five Sixers in double figures against Boston.

Thaddeus Young scored 15 points and Nick Young added 14 off the bench.

The Sixers were without Kwame Brown, who missed the game with a strained calf. Kevin Garnett did not play for Boston.

Rivers endorses Collins. Collins and Rivers have had their names tossed around as potential Olympic coaches. Rivers thinks that Collins would be good for the job.

"Doug, he'd be great," Rivers said of Collins, a member of the 1972 U.S. Olympic team. "When you think about the history . . . I just think that the best guy that will help us win is the right way to go."


http://www.philly.com/philly/sports/sixers/20121016_Sixers_Andrew_Bynum_to_begin_practicing_Oct__24.html
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Re: Andrew Bynum Discussion

Postby The Rock on Wed Oct 17, 2012 8:45 pm

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Re: Andrew Bynum Discussion

Postby Frank Dux on Wed Oct 17, 2012 9:29 pm

^That is seriously the worst haircut in the league.
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Re: Andrew Bynum Discussion

Postby LTLakerFan on Wed Oct 17, 2012 11:13 pm

He is seriously going to be "sloth like" in the early part of the season.
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Re: Andrew Bynum Discussion

Postby KB&AB on Thu Oct 18, 2012 7:40 pm

PHILADELPHIA — Evan Turner called the preseason “the pre-Bynum era.” Nick Young said Thursday that he can’t wait until the Andrew Bynum era arrives.

“When Bynum comes back, double-team city,” a smiling Young said. “We’re going to be flying with them 3s. ‘I’m open. I’m open.’ Andrew’s going to be the focal point. That’s going to take a lot of pressure off me.”

Bynum, who is sitting out the preseason to rehabilitate his knees, eventually is expected to draw plenty of attention from opposing defenses that should result in open shots for his teammates. Once he returns, the Sixers plan to continue getting out on the fastbreak as much as possible.

Doug Collins harkens back to the Lakers’ “Showtime” days of the 1980s with Magic Johnson, James Worthy and big man Kareem Abdul-Jabbar for an example of how it could work.

“They pushed that ball,” Collins said. “But when they got in the halfcourt, the ball went through Kareem.

“From our standpoint, we don’t want to, just because Andrew comes back, be a halfcourt team. We want to continue to push that ball. Then when the game gets slowed down, we want to play through him in the post. We think you can incorporate both.”

Veteran Jason Richardson believes that’s realistic.

“I think we’ve just got to find a happy medium between the two — of pushing the ball and fast-breaking, and getting him the ball in the half-court game,” Richardson said. “We definitely want him to get his touches. He’s going to be the No. 1 option.”

Collins is looking for the Sixers to average eight made 3-pointers a game in the regular season and wants them to look for 3s in transition and the half-court offense. They're at 8.5 in the four preseason games on 47.2 percent shooting without Bynum, which is an indication of their upgraded perimeter personnel.

A year ago, the Sixers averaged 5.3 3-pointers and 36.2 percent en route to a 35-31 record.

“We have a lot of weapons,” Nick Young said.

The Sixers, who hope Bynum will practice for the first time Wednesday, play their final three preseason games in the next four days, starting Friday night against the Nets in Brooklyn.

Reserve center Kwame Brown (strained calf) will miss his third straight contest, but Collins hopes Brown will be able to return Sunday (in Boston) and Monday (in Syracuse vs. the Knicks). The regular-season opener is Wednesday against the Nuggets.


yesterday i watched 76ers vs Cavs on NBATV. i know its only preseason but the young Sixers looked very good. They have a lot of three point shooters. I was impressed. I was wrong about Nick Young. He plays so well. I was surprised that Maalik is good. Holiday, Turner, Dwright, Thad Young are good too. I think they can win 45-50 this season.
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Re: Andrew Bynum Discussion

Postby revgen on Thu Oct 18, 2012 8:22 pm

LOL at Collins comparing the 76ers to Showtime. :man10:

I know he's trying to motivate his team, but it's still hilarious.
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Re: Andrew Bynum Discussion

Postby The Original 81 on Thu Oct 18, 2012 8:45 pm

revgen wrote:LOL at Collins comparing the 76ers to Showtime. :man10:

I know he's trying to motivate his team, but it's still hilarious.


Lol yea, he's reaching a bit with that one.

I just hope Drew continues to stay healthy. This team is definitely a good fit for him offensively, maybe being the number one option will get him to bring it more on the defensive end.
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Re: Andrew Bynum Discussion

Postby KB24 on Fri Oct 19, 2012 9:31 am

Bynum in a fast break offense could be a pretty ugly experience...not sure he has the legs, speed and conditioning to run the floor up and down.

He was pretty much always behind the play running back.
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Re: Andrew Bynum Discussion

Postby revgen on Fri Oct 19, 2012 9:54 am

KB24 wrote:Bynum in a fast break offense could be a pretty ugly experience...not sure he has the legs, speed and conditioning to run the floor up and down.

He was pretty much always behind the play running back.


I don't see that being a problem. Kareem was always a trailer during the Showtime days.

Fast-breaking is more for the other guys on the team then it is for Bynum since he's the only one who can efficiently create his own shot in a half-court setting on a consistent basis.
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Re: Andrew Bynum Discussion

Postby revgen on Fri Oct 19, 2012 10:02 am

lakerswiz wrote:I would watch out for that 76'ers team in the East. Well coached and they're very excited.


I see them as a solid play-off team. Same as last season. The only difference is that they are younger and hence have more upside. Philly is hoping that Turner and Holliday grow into all-star caliber players along with Bynum to create a "big 3". I think they are a bit too optimistic, but it'll be interesting to see what happens.
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Re: Andrew Bynum Discussion

Postby XXIV on Fri Oct 19, 2012 12:46 pm

revgen wrote:
lakerswiz wrote:I would watch out for that 76'ers team in the East. Well coached and they're very excited.


I see them as a solid play-off team. Same as last season. The only difference is that they are younger and hence have more upside. Philly is hoping that Turner and Holliday grow into all-star caliber players along with Bynum to create a "big 3". I think they are a bit too optimistic, but it'll be interesting to see what happens.


With Iguadola gone Turner should have a better season, but he appears most effective when he has the ball in his hands as their PG/SG combo. With Holiday being their primary point it'll be interesting to see how they will coexist and how Bynum will fit into the whole scheme.
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